East Devon landowner feared a Russian invasion

PUBLISHED: 12:02 02 August 2018

Conservation society committee members with Pat Bennet (second left) Tom Sunderland (third left) and George Allhusen (far right). Picture: CONTRIBUTED

Conservation society committee members with Pat Bennet (second left) Tom Sunderland (third left) and George Allhusen (far right). Picture: CONTRIBUTED

Archant

New information board explains why the Crimean Seat on the Seaton to Lyme undercliffs was built as a lookout post

A visitor at the Crimean Seat. Picture: CONTRIBUTEDA visitor at the Crimean Seat. Picture: CONTRIBUTED

Axe Vale and District Conservation Society has unveiled an information board at The Crimean Seat - a curious shelter situated on the coast path between Lyme Regis and Seaton.

Built of flint by John Ames, in the 19th century, the unusual structure was created on what is now the Undercliffs National Nature Reserve.

He was paranoid about the Russians invading Britain during the Crimean War, so he built the shelter where he could keep a look-out.

Today the Crimean Seat can be accessed via a new permissive footpath that loops off from the Lyme Regis to Seaton Coast path, making a short circular walk of about three miles.

The conservation group has thanked all who helped with the production of the board, including George Allhusen, on whose land it now sits, Pat Bennet whose donation paid for it, and Tom Sunderland, the reserve manager from Natural England. A map used as the background to the board’s layout was kindly provided by Lyme Regis Museum.


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