Exmouth Royal Navy sailor follows in granddad’s footsteps: “I hope he would be proud of me,”

PUBLISHED: 07:00 09 June 2018

HOMETOWN STORY FOR LLOGS (WTR) CATHERINE STANTON

Image of  Leading Logistics Writer Catherine Stanton one of HMS Albion's writers in charge of travel.

HOMETOWN STORY FOR LLOGS (WTR) CATHERINE STANTON Image of Leading Logistics Writer Catherine Stanton one of HMS Albion's writers in charge of travel.

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An Exmouth woman is following in the footsteps of her grandfather while serving with the Royal Navy in the Far East.

Former Exmouth Community College student Catherine Stanton began her working life aged 19 with a part time job at an Exmouth beach café – a decade later she is serving on board the Royal Navy’s fleet flagship, the 23,000-tonne amphibious assault ship, HMS Albion.

Catherine works in the ship’s office as a writer, a term in the Royal Navy for those involved with administration.

She said: “My grandfather served as a writer in the Navy in the 1950s and 1960s, eventually retiring as a Chief Petty Officer. Although I never met him, I hope he would be proud of me.”

Captain Tim Neild, HMS Albion’s Commanding Officer, said: “Catherine Stanton is a first class writer and a valued member of the A-team.

“Like all the young men and women under my command, she’s bright, motivated and incredibly proud to serve her country. They are quite simply the best ambassadors we could wish for.”

HMS Albion, a 23,000-tonne amphibious assault ship, left Plymouth at the beginning February tasked with strengthening the UK’s ties throughout the Asia-Pacific region; its diplomatic visits include Singapore, Indonesia, Brunei and Japan.

Catherine’s duties include arranging the travel movements for the large numbers of Royal Marines and Officer Cadets who will join and leave at different stages of the 10 month deployment, plus coordinating ‘moral-boosting’ deliveries of mail as HMS Albion works her way across the globe.

“When we arrived in Singapore in April after more than three weeks at sea there were 140 bags waiting for us, and with 500 people onboard it took hours to sort through,” said Catherine.

“Language is obviously a challenge in the Far East and it can be quite complex to navigate the local laws and customs, but that’s what makes it interesting.”

“Some of my friends in the Navy are a little envious as HMS Albion is the first ship to visit some of these places for six or seven years.”

Catherine, who likes to walk on Exmouth beach when is home, joined the Royal Navy in 2009 and served on the aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious and at the Royal Navy’s Middle East headquarters in Bahrain.


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