Exhibition to remember our WW1 heroes in Honiton

PUBLISHED: 07:00 16 July 2016 | UPDATED: 08:44 20 July 2016

Pte Langelaan’s grave, with evidence of the state of overgrowth in that part of the graveyard. The area around this and the other war graves were cleared recently by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. In the background is another WW1 grave (that of William Ackland). Photo by Ian Hosker.

Pte Langelaan's grave, with evidence of the state of overgrowth in that part of the graveyard. The area around this and the other war graves were cleared recently by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. In the background is another WW1 grave (that of William Ackland). Photo by Ian Hosker.

Archant

An exhibition dedicated to six World War One veterans buried in an unmaintained part of St Michael's churchyard in Honiton is being held this month.

The exhibition will be held at Honiton Library and the Allhallows Museum, to tell the stories of the fallen soldiers.

Sidmouth-based photographer Ian Hosker has carefully recorded each monument erected by their families up to a century ago.

The following soldiers will be featured: Henry Langelaan, 21, whose father Henry was a stonemason at New Street, Honiton. Pte Langelaan was advancing with the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry when he was fatally wounded by shrapnel on July 26 at Trones Wood, Somme, and died on August 16, 1916, at Wigan Voluntary Hospital.

Pte Wilfred Gould, 22, of 4 Batt. Devonshires, was the son of William and Elizabeth Gould, of the White Lion, Honiton. Before the war, Wilfred had been a clerk with E W Hellier.

He was discharged on January 1, 1916, suffering from tuberculosis, as did thousands of infantry. He died at the White Lion Inn on August 3, 1916.

Air Mechanic Reginald John Broom, age 35, joined the 1st Devonshires, but was invalided out in October 1914, only weeks after war began.

The son of John and Elizabeth Broom, in January, 1918, Reginald joined the Royal Flying Corp (RFC) based at Perham Down. He died in February, 1918, aged 35, shortly before the RFC became the Royal Air Force.

Pte John Wilberforce Tweed, 50, of the Canadian Infantry, is the oldest known soldier buried in St Michael’s. He was born in Honiton in 1896, but emigrated to Calgary in 1899 and married Mary Tweed, of Vancouver. He died of pneumonia in Honiton on December 29, 1916.

Ordinary seaman William Acland, 36, served on HMS Onyx, part of 1st Submarine Flotilla. Seaman Acland was the husband of Flossie Ackland, of the Lamb Inn, Honiton.

He died of influenza on October 29, 1918, in the naval hospital at Plymouth, only 13 days before the Armistice.

Corporal Richard Vivian Smith 86556 Royal Field Artillery, aged 22, died at the Honiton Auxilliary Hospital on July 20, 1918, of ‘wounds received in action’. He was the son of Mrs Octavia Smith, of New Botley. Corporal Smith’s name does not appear on the Honiton war memorial.

‘Forgotten Soldiers’ of World War One exhibition will be held at Honiton Library from Monday, July 18, to July 23, and Allhallows Museum from July 23 onwards.

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